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Obama: New sanctions against Russia are 'teed up'

President Barack Obama speaks as he participates in a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the Akasaka Palace state guest house in Tokyo Thursday, April 24, 2014. Obama says the time is now to resolve issues preventing the conclusion of a major, 12-nation trade agreement. Opening a four-country swing through the Asia-Pacific region, Obama is aiming to promote the U.S. as a committed economic, military and political partner, but the West's dispute with Russia over Ukraine threatens to cast a shadow over the president's sales mission. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) TOKYO (AP) — Warning Russia that new economic sanctions are "teed up," President Barack Obama accused Moscow of failing to live up to an agreement last week to ease tensions in eastern Ukraine.


Obama says Russia not abiding by Geneva agreement

A pro-Russian armed man stands guard near the state security service building in Slaviansk Slavyansk (Ukraine) (AFP) - US President Barack Obama said Thursday Russia was not abiding by agreements aimed at defusing the crisis in Ukraine and warned of "consequences." "There was some possibility that Russia could take the wiser course after the meeting in Geneva. So far at least we have seen them not abide by the spirit or the letter of the agreement in Geneva," Obama said in Tokyo in his first public comments since the Geneva meeting.


Vermont moves toward labeling of GMO foods

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Vermont lawmakers have passed the country's first state bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods as such, setting up a war between powerful lobbyists for the behemoth U.S. food industry and an American public that overwhelmingly says it approves of the idea.

The occultist who co-founded NASA's JPL

The occultist who co-founded NASA's JPL Jack Whiteside Parsons was an unusual man. He co-founded both the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Aerojet Engineering Corporation, created pyrotechnics for the film industry, wrote a book of poems and masturbated onto "magical tablets" in an attempt to conjure a lover. At Wired UK, Olivia Solon intertwines her interview with biographer George Pendle with a look into the rocket engineer's occult-tinted history. ...


FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014 photo, Talia Eisenberg, co-founder of the Henley Vaporium, uses her vaping device in New York. Soon, the Food and Drug Administration will propose rules for e-cigarettes. The rules will have big implications for a fast-growing industry and its legions of customers. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File) The government wants to ban sales to minors and require health warning labels.


How Google completely botched the Google Glass rollout

How Google completely botched the Google Glass rollout Google Glass has had a rough year in the court of public opinion. Not only has the device become the fodder of jokes for late-night comedians, but even some of its high-profile early adopters have started bashing it with gleeful abandon. Forbes has written a good autopsy of all the mistakes that Google has made when rolling out Glass to the general public and it gives some pretty convincing answers about why something that generated massive media hype when it was first teased two years ago is now seen as the next Segway. One thing that immediately stands out in the Forbes piece is that Google probably shouldn’t have released Glass on a limited basis for a whopping $1,500 per device.


FDA's new e-cigarette regulations target 'healthier than tobacco' claims

FDA's new e-cigarette regulations target 'healthier than tobacco' claims The first federal regulations for electronic cigarettes will be announced this Thursday, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The proposals will include a ban on sales to minors, as well as requiring approval from the FDA, as well as health warning labels. E-cigarettes contain nicotine liquid, which is derived from tobacco -- and that's where the FDA comes in.


Fecal transplants work with frozen feces, too

Fecal transplants work with frozen feces, too Ever since the FDA stopped making doctors seek approval to perform fecal transplants on Clostridium difficile patients (C. difficile) in early 2013, the procedure has become more widely accepted. The method, which involves introducing fecal matter from a healthy donor into the gut of an unhealthy donor, has a 90 percent success rate, so its increasing popularity should come as no surprise. Fortunately, a group of researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital have given it the old clinical study try. C. difficile is a serious infection that kills 14,000 people in the US each year.


American kids are more likely to be medicated for behavioral problems if they're in poor or military families

American kids are more likely to be medicated for behavioral problems if they're in poor or military families An estimated 7.5 percent of American children age 6-17 were prescribed drugs to treat behavioral and emotional difficulties in 2011, according to a CDC report published today. Furthermore, the CDC reports that nearly 8 percent of children whose parents are members of the US military and 9.2 percent of children from families with incomes below the poverty line take prescription drugs for these same problems. Unfortunately, the report does not state what these medications are. "The survey doesn't ask questions on specific types of medications, so we don't know the types that they are using," says LaJeana Howie, a CDC statistician who worked on the report.


IBM's Watson supercomputer will soon be your personal shopper

IBM's Watson supercomputer will soon be your personal shopper Watson had been a doctor, a geneticist, a game show contestant and even a chef in the past. But now IBM's supercomputer has a new career: personal shopping. IBM has partnered with digital commerce firm Fluid to develop a cloud-based app called Expert Personal Shopper (XPS), which uses Watson's brains to answer buyers' highly specific questions.


New crystal material could lead to shape-shifting displays

New crystal material could lead to shape-shifting displays Scientists at the University of Michigan have developed a type of material that can change its appearance when subjected to light. The material is host to crystals that react to different wavelengths of light, moving into new shapes and patterns on the fly, without the need for an underlying template.


Video: Project CARS looks like the killer racing game Xbox One and PS4 fans have been craving

Video: Project CARS looks like the killer racing game Xbox One and PS4 fans have been craving The market for racing games has been left wide open in the new generation of consoles. Forza Motorsport 5 and Need for Speed: Rivals attempted to fill the gap last fall, but with the extended delay of the PlayStation 4 exclusive Driveclub, Project CARS has taken the reins. Developed by Slightly Mad Studios, Project CARS (Community Assisted Racing Simulator) is an impossibly gorgeous racing game with one of the most interesting development cycles of any title announced for the new consoles. Anyone who purchased a Tool Pack from Slightly Mad Studios during the funding period of the project became a member of the development team, gaining access to private forums, exclusive content and even the ability to attend weekly meetings depending on the chosen


All at sea: global shipping fleet exposed to hacking threat

A magnifying glass is held in front of a computer screen in this picture illustration taken in Berlin By Jeremy Wagstaff SINGAPORE (Reuters) - The next hacker playground: the open seas - and the oil tankers and container vessels that ship 90 percent of the goods moved around the planet. Somali pirates help choose their targets by viewing navigational data online, prompting ships to either turn off their navigational devices, or fake the data so it looks like they're somewhere else; While data on the extent of the maritime industry's exposure to cyber crime is hard to come by, a study of the related energy sector by insurance brokers Willis this month found that the industry "may be sitting on an uninsured time bomb". Globally, it estimated that cyber attacks against oil and gas infrastructure will cost energy companies close to $1.9 billion by 2018.


FCC chairman says reports of net neutrality's death are 'flat out wrong'

FCC chairman says reports of net neutrality's death are 'flat out wrong' Tomorrow, the Federal Communications Commission will propose new net neutrality rules that will reportedly destroy the concept of net neutrality as we know it, making it okay for internet service providers to establish a "fast lane" for preferred customers and charge an additional toll. Needless to say, those who care about net neutrality weren't too happy to hear that an organization that is supposed to protect communications might sell out to corporate interests. However, Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler, a former cable industry lobbyist, says that there has been "no turnaround in policy," and calls those reports "flat out wrong." Here's the FCC chairman's full statement:


​Xiaomi plans to expand sales to 10 new markets, but the US isn't one of them

​Xiaomi plans to expand sales to 10 new markets, but the US isn't one of them Looking forward to the day you can buy a Xiaomi smartphone in the US? Keep waiting. The company's founder announced the first ten countries in Xiaomi's international expansion today, and the United States didn't make the cut.


Oklahoma court rejects death-row inmates' claims

This photo combo of images provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Clayton Lockett, left, and Charles Warner. Lockett and Warner, two death-row inmates who want to know the source of drugs that will be used to execute them, have placed Oklahoma’s two highest courts at odds and prompted aggravated members of the Legislature to call for the impeachment of Oklahoma Supreme Court justices. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections) Court says inmates are not entitled to know source of drugs that will be used to kill them.


Women held in Cleveland basement seek Joan Rivers' apology

SiriusXM's "Howard Stern Birthday Bash" - Arrivals CLEVELAND (AP) — Attorneys for two women held in a Cleveland home and abused for a decade say Joan Rivers should apologize for comparing living in her daughter's guest room with the captivity they experienced.


Facebook first-quarter revenue grows 72 percent on rising mobile ads

The loading screen of the Facebook application on a mobile phone is seen in this photo illustration taken in Lavigny By Alexei Oreskovic SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook Inc's mobile advertising business accelerated in the first three months of the year, helping the Internet social networking company top Wall Street's financial targets. Shares of Facebook were up nearly 3 percent at $63.05 in after-hours trading on Wednesday. Facebook said that mobile ads represented 59 percent of its ad revenue in the first quarter, up from 30 percent in the year-ago period. Facebook's overall revenue grew 72 percent year-on-year to $2.5 billion in the first quarter, above the $2.36 billion expected by analysts polled by Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S. "They've got the right products for what advertisers are looking for and that's manifesting itself in the results you're seeing," said JMP Securities analyst Ronald Josey.


Aspirin halves colon cancer risk -- if you have certain gene

File photo showing employees of German pharmaceuticals group Bayer checking Aspirin Complex drugs in Bitterfeld, eastern Germany Aspirin can reduce the risk of colon cancer by half, but only in people who carry high levels of a specific type of gene, a study released Wednesday found. Researchers previously were aware that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin could reduce colorectal cancer risks, but they did not understand why some saw a benefit and others did not, according to the study in Science Translational Medicine. Scientists studied tissues from people who developed colon cancer while on an aspirin regimen then set out to understand why people with a particular gene appeared to get a protective benefit from aspirin and others did not. They examined tissues of 270 colon cancer patients from 127,865 participants followed for over three decades.


Dish will reportedly reveal its Internet-TV service this summer

Dish will reportedly reveal its Internet-TV service this summer Every company in the market wants to provide its own online TV streaming service, but Dish might be the first to give consumers a real offer. Bloomberg reports that Dish Network is looking to bring an Internet-TV service to the United States this summer, a set of live-streaming channels that will be accessible through connected devices such as smartphones and tablets. Disney signed onto the service last month, and A&E, Turner Broadcasting and CBS have reportedly been in talks with the provider as well. Some content providers have reportedly decided that certain conditions must be met before they will jump on board. For them to join, two of the four major networks (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) must be part of the service, along with


FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay for faster delivery over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes, but enhance scrutiny of such deals so they don't harm competition or limit free speech.

FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay for faster delivery over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes, but enhance scrutiny of such deals so they don't harm competition or limit free speech.

Facebook's mobile focus is paying off

Facebook's mobile focus is paying off It's clear that when Facebook said it was going to be a mobile-first company back in 2013, it meant it. It's now surpassed 1 billion active mobile users a month, which is about a 34 percent increase compared to a year ago. Sure, a lot has happened in the land of likes in the early part of 2014 -- it spent close to $19 billion for WhatsApp and another $2 billion for Oculus VR -- but its primary source of income for the year still comes from good ol' advertising on its core product: Facebook.


U.S. judge denies Apple's move to hold off e-book antitrust trial

An Apple logo is seen during Black Friday in San Francisco A U.S. federal judge denied a bid by Apple Inc on Wednesday to hold off a trial in a case brought by state attorneys general accusing the company of conspiring with five major publishers to fix e-book prices. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in a brief order said the July 14 trial had already been postponed once and should go forward, paving the way for more than two dozen states to pursue hundreds of millions of dollars in damages. Following a non-jury trial last year, Cote found that Apple from 2009 to 2010 conspired with the publishers to raise e-book prices and impede competitors such as Amazon.com Inc. The trial to assign damages was supposed to be held in May but it was pushed back two months to allow adequate time for class notification, Cote's order said. Apple later on Wednesday asked a federal appeals court to intervene and halt the trial.


Apple expands buybacks by $30 billion, OKs 7-for-1 stock split

Apple's iPad devices are displayed at its store in Tokyo By Edwin Chan SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Apple Inc has approved another $30 billion in share buybacks till the end of 2015 and authorized a rarely seen seven-for-one stock split, addressing calls to share more of its cash hoard while broadening the stock's appeal to individual investors. Activist investor Carl Icahn, who had famously called on the iPhone maker to boost its buyback program, tweeted his approval of the move on Wednesday. On Wednesday, Apple reported sales of 43.7 million iPhones in the quarter ended March, far outpacing the roughly 38 million that Wall Street had predicted. But whether Apple can again produce a revolutionary new product remains the central question in investors' and Silicon Valley executives' minds.


Apple slice: Share split makes joining the Dow more likely

Who says Apple does not want to be in the Dow Jones industrial average? The iPhone maker's market value has stood high above most U.S. corporations' for a few years, yet Apple still isn't a component of that blue-chip stock benchmark. That is because the Dow weighs its 30 components by price, so a $500 stock would overwhelm the index. A seven-for-one stock split that will chop the price to about $75 changes the picture.

Apple resets the clock as investors await next big thing

The Apple logo is pictured at a retail store in the Marina neighborhood in San Francisco By Edwin Chan SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Apple Inc just bought itself some much-needed time. On Wednesday, the company surprised Wall Street with news that it sold more iPhones in the March quarter than even the most bullish analysts had expected. To top it all off, Apple unveiled a 7-for-1 stock split that should go down well with individuals who want a piece of a household name but could not afford to fork over $500 a share. The litany of positive numbers sent Apple's long-stagnant shares up 8 percent.


Android apps vulnerable to Heartbleed have been downloaded 150 million times

Android apps vulnerable to Heartbleed have been downloaded 150 million times Patching up Android to make sure it’s not vulnerable to Heartbleed is one thing. Patching all vulnerable Android apps, on the other hand, is quite another. Re/code draws our attention to a new study from research firm FireEye that claims there have been around 150 million downloads of Android apps that are vulnerable to the Heartbleed bug. And to make matters worse, the researchers say that the assorted “Heartbleed detectors” you can now find in the Google Play store will do little to help you root out vulnerable apps you’ve downloaded. “Android apps frequently use native libraries, which either directly or indirectly leverage vulnerable OpenSSL libraries,” the researchers write. “Therefore, even though the Android platform itself is not vulnerable, attackers


U.S. regulators to propose new net neutrality rules in May

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies before the House Communications and Technology panel on Capitol Hill in Washington By Alina Selyukh WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. regulators are expected to vote on May 15 on a new set of so-called "net neutrality" rules aimed at making certain that broadband providers do not slow down or block consumers' access to legal Internet content. The rules from the Federal Communications Commission, which released its framework in February, are expected to ensure network operators disclose how they manage Internet traffic and do not block any content on the Web. The proposed rules are also expected to allow Internet providers to negotiate agreements with content providers on delivery of traffic to users as long as the deals they strike are "commercially reasonable," according to an FCC spokesman. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has also said he planned to review the practices adopted by Internet providers on a case-by-case basis.


Daily Roundup: Samsung's love of plastic, Siri for Apple TV and more!

Daily Roundup: Samsung's love of plastic, Siri for Apple TV and more! You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.


Apple increases stock buyback, will split stock

FILE - In this Dec. 23, 2013 file photo, a woman using a phone walks past Apple's logo near its retail outlet in Beijing. Apple reports quarterly earnings on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File) SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple is doling out more of its cash to shareholders and preparing to split its stock for the first time in nine years in an attempt to win back investors fretting about the iPhone maker's slowing sales growth and pace of innovation.


Doctors want to fix you with 3D-printed tissues made from water droplets

Doctors want to fix you with 3D-printed tissues made from water droplets Doctors dream of using 3D-printed tissues to patch up injuries, but current techniques tend to kill a lot of the cells used in the process. Thankfully, researchers at Oxford University spin-off OxSyBio have found a gentler way to build these materials. Their technique 3D prints water droplets filled with chemicals that let them change shape and transmit electrical signals like real cells.


3-D imaging captures 1888 wreckage discovered in San Francisco Bay

This 2013 image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows a multi-beam sonar profile view of the shipwreck of the iron and wood steamship City of Chester. In 1888 on a trip from the San Francisco bay to Eureka, the Chester was split in two by a ship more than twice its size, killing 16 people and becoming the bay's second-worst maritime disaster. Now, more than a century later, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration team has found the shipwreck. The team came upon the wreckage in 217 feet of water just inside the Golden Gate while it was charting shipping channels. (AP Photo/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The first images of the newly discovered wreckage of a steamship that sank in San Francisco Bay in 1888, killing 16 people, were released Wednesday by federal ocean scientists.


Brazil passes an internet bill of rights enshrining net neutrality and privacy

Brazil passes an internet bill of rights enshrining net neutrality and privacy While the world has been deciding who governs the internet, Brazil has been busy establishing internet rules of its own -- and they may just set an example for everyone else. The country has passed a bill of rights that goes some length towards protecting net neutrality and privacy. To start, the law promises equal access to the internet; carriers can't charge more for bandwidth-heavy services like streaming video.


Samsung lures developers to smartwatches with $1.25 million in cash

Samsung lures developers to smartwatches with $1.25 million in cash By all accounts, consumer responses to smartwatches have not exactly been enthusiastic so far. Big gadget makers will continue to push smartwatches and other wearables as growth in the smartphone market continues to slow, but without compelling functionality and solid ecosystems, those efforts will be exceedingly difficult. To address the latter point, Samsung has decided to dangle a pretty massive carrot it hopes developers will chase. As noted by SamMobile on Wednesday, Samsung is now trying to lure developers by offering $1.25 million in prize money as part of a big app contest. Complete details are not yet available, but the contest will aim to encourage developers to make apps for Samsung’s Gear smartwatches. For those interested in the challenge, it looks


Zynga's Pincus withdraws from operations amid turnaround

Zynga CEO Mark Pincus speaks at the Zynga Unleashed event in San Francisco By Malathi Nayak SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Zynga Inc co-founder Mark Pincus is relinquishing the last of his operational duties at the social gaming company starting on Wednesday and retreating to an advisory role as Chief Executive Officer Don Mattrick pushes through a restructuring plan. Zynga shares were up 5 percent in after-hours trading on Wednesday after closing at $4.42 on the Nasdaq. Pincus, who remains chairman of the board, has decided to move on from day-to-day operations as chief product officer, Zynga said in a statement. He has been stepping back from the company that once dominated gaming on Facebook with "Farmville" and raked in over $1 billion in revenues, but is losing users to mobile game developers.


Formula One racing boss set to go on trial for bribery

Canadian F1 Grand Prix - Race By Keith Weir MUNICH (Reuters) - Formula One chief executive Bernie Ecclestone goes on trial for bribery in Germany on Thursday in a case that could see the Briton's long dominance of the motor sport ended by a jail sentence. Prosecutors in Munich have charged Ecclestone, 83, with bribing jailed German banker Gerhard Gribkowsky to smooth the sale eight years ago of a stake in Formula One to private equity firm CVC. Ecclestone, a former used car salesman who became a billionaire by building the sport into a global money spinner over the past four decades, denies wrongdoing and says he will fight to clear his name. CVC remains the largest shareholder in Formula One, a business that generates annual revenues of over $1.5 billion from its series of grand prix races held around the world.


One of Activision's top moneymakers gets a new entry in Skylanders: Trap Team

One of Activision's top moneymakers gets a new entry in Skylanders: Trap Team Like taxes, iPhones and, well, Madden, you can count on a new Skylanders game every year. If you're unfamiliar with the franchise, that may just be a symptom of not being around kids -- the toy / ...


Vermont lawmakers send GMO food-labeling law to governor

A law that would make Vermont the first U.S. state to enact mandatory labeling of foods made with genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, received final approval from state lawmakers on Wednesday and now heads to the governor's desk. The Vermont House of Representative passed the bill 114-30. Last week, the Vermont Senate, by a vote of 28-2, approved the measure, which requires foods containing GMOs sold at retail outlets to be labeled as having been produced or partially produced with "genetic engineering." "Vermont's leading the nation on this, giving consumers basic information about the food that they are eating," said Falko Schilling, a spokesman for the Vermont Public Interest Research Group, which backed the bill. The Vermont bill also makes it illegal to describe any food product containing GMOs as "natural" or "all natural." Unlike bills passed last year in Maine and Connecticut, which require other states to pass GMO labeling laws before they can be enacted, Vermont's contains no such trigger clause.

HBO is coming to Amazon Instant Video

HBO is coming to Amazon Instant Video Arliss? Nope. The Larry Sanders Show? Nope. Hung? Nope. The Mind of the Married Man? Nope. Mr. Show? Nope. Oz? Nope. Tenacious D? Nope — but you do get Flight of the Conchords. Bored to Death? Nope. The Wire? Yes! Sex and the City? Nope.


Prince Charles' brother-in-law dies in NYC after fall

Mark Shand NEW YORK (AP) — The brother-in-law of the Prince of Wales died Wednesday after falling outside a hotel bar and suffering a head injury, police said.


Man killed in Utah court had promised judge he'd behave

This Feburary 2012 photo, provided by the Utah Department of Corrections, shows Siale Angilau. A U.S. marshal shot and critically wounded Angilau on Monday, April 21, 2014, in a new federal courthouse after Angilau rushed the witness stand with a pen at his trial in Salt Lake City, authorities said. Angilau was one of 17 people named in a 29-count racketeering indictment filed in 2008 accusing gang members of conspiracy, assault, robbery and weapons offenses. The FBI said Angilau died Monday at the hospital. (AP Photo/Utah Department of Corrections) SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Tongan Crip gang defendant who was fatally shot by a U.S. marshal while attacking a witness during a federal court trial had promised a judge earlier that he would behave, a court transcript shows.


Zynga founder Pincus leaving operations role

In this May 2, 2012 photo, Zynga CEO Mark Pincus smiles in front of one of their popular games "Zynga CityVille" at Zynga headquarters in San Francisco. Pincus is stepping down as chief product officer, less than a year after he was replaced as the company's CEO, as the company's sales slide. Zynga said Wednesday, April 23, 2014, that Pincus will remain chairman of the company he founded in 2007. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma) NEW YORK (AP) — Online game maker Zynga's founder Mark Pincus is stepping down as chief product officer, less than a year after he was replaced as the company's CEO, as the company's sales slide.


Facebook 1Q results soar; CFO to step down

FILE - This Tuesday, July 16, 2013 file photo shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook reports quarterly earnings on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File) NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's earnings nearly tripled and revenue grew sharply in the first quarter, surpassing Wall Street's expectations thanks to an 82 percent increase in advertising revenue.


Brazil enacts Internet 'Bill of Rights'

People hold a banner in support of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff as she addresses the opening ceremony of NETmundial, a major conference on the future of Internet governance in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Rousseff ratified a bill guaranteeing Internet privacy and enshrining access to the Web during the conference. (AP Photo/Andre Penner) SAO PAULO (AP) — Brazil's president signed into law on Wednesday a "Bill of Rights" for the digital age that aims to protect online privacy and promote the Internet as a public utility by barring telecommunications companies from charging for preferential access to their networks.


Amazon's Prime Pantry service lets you ship 45 pounds of groceries for a $6 fee

Amazon's Prime Pantry service lets you ship 45 pounds of groceries for a $6 fee Amazon's dead-set on killing off the grocery store, with a same-day delivery service and even a Dash gadget for restocking items around the house. Now the retailer's going one step further, taking on Costco and Walmart with a new program called Prime Pantry. If you're a Prime member living in the 48 contiguous states, you can ship 45 pounds' worth of household essentials -- in "everyday sizes," not in bulk -- for a flat fee of $6.


Amid Russia warning, Ukraine is in a security bind

A pro-Russian masked gunman mans his post on a street in the center of Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Pro-Russian gunmen in eastern Ukraine admitted on Wednesday that they are holding American journalist Simon Ostrovsky, saying he was suspected of unspecified "bad activities." (AP Photo/Sergei Grits) DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — Russia's foreign minister warned Wednesday that attacks on Russian citizens or interests in Ukraine would bring a firm response and drew a comparison to the circumstances that opened the war with Georgia in 2008.


Weak chip sales to aero, defense clients hurt Xilinx

(Reuters) - Chipmaker Xilinx Inc forecast current-quarter revenue largely below analysts' average estimate, saying it expects sales from its aerospace, defense and wired telecom customers to be flat. Shares of Xilinx, which also reported weaker-than-expected profit for the quarter ended March 29, were down 5 percent in extended trade. Xilinx said it expected first-quarter revenue to stay flat or rise up to 4 percent sequentially. Analysts on average were expecting revenue of $638.4 million, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S. The company, which gets nearly half its revenue from telecom customers, expects fourth-quarter gross margins of about 68 percent.

Qualcomm's quarterly revenue growth dwindles, shares fall

A Qualcomm sign is seen at one of Qualcomm's numerous buildings located on its San Diego Campus By Noel Randewich SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Qualcomm Inc on Wednesday posted its smallest quarterly revenue increase since 2010 as it wrestles with a smartphone market that is losing steam and shifting to China, sending its shares lower. With expansion in the smartphone industry moving away from wealthy markets such as the United States and toward China and other developing countries, where consumers favor less expensive devices, Qualcomm's once-impressive revenue growth is tapering off and it is focusing on costs to preserve its profitability. It was far lower than the quarterly growth rates of over 20 percent that Qualcomm investors until recently have been accustomed to. Less growth than expected in recent months in China, where China Mobile is preparing to launch a new, faster network with 4G, or LTE, technology, hurt Qualcomm's results in the quarter, Chief Executive Steve Mollenkopf told Reuters.


Oldest living ex-MLB player dies in Cuba at 102

Conrado Marrero, oldest living ex-MLB player, dies at 102 (Photo taken on April 25, 2012.) (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes) HAVANA (AP) — Conrado Marrero, the diminutive Cuban right-hander who pitched for the Washington Senators in the 1950s and in 2011 became the oldest living former Major League Baseball player, died in Havana on Wednesday. He was 102, just two days short of his 103rd birthday.


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